About Mennonites: 6 Warnings From an Outsider.

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For my American friends I should begin with a little education on what “Mennonite” means. You are probably picturing Amish farmers and women in head covering driving around in buggies, right? This is sometimes accurate. In Manitoba and other places however, it could mean a faith or a heritage. Similar to saying you’re Jewish could mean your faith or heritage.

If you are marrying a Mennonite-heritage man like I did, here’s a crash course on what you need to know.

1. Low German. A language (like a European- Creole) of German, Dutch, Russian, and whatever else happens to be thrown in there mixed with made up words that don’t belong to any language. It’s impossible for an outsider to learn.

* Tip: In any circumstance just nod your head and respond with “Nayo”. That is the only word you’ll ever need. I have no idea if that’s how it’s spelled or what it means but it seems to work.

2. Mennonite Food. Usually consists of a mix of heavy cream, salt, sugar and grease. Not necessarily in that order. You must understand nothing you make will be as good as his “Oma’s” (Grandma’s). Even if you used the same recipe and same ingredients, it won’t compare. Reasons I have been given include but are not limited to,OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

“Oma grew her own <cabbage/potatoes/snap peas/rainbows and sunshine > in the garden.”

“The milk came from a cow in the backyard and THIS(wrinkled nose) is from Smiths.”

“It’s because Oma had a special <pan/spoon/bowl/magic wand> that was smuggled in her purse from Russia when running from the Soviets.”

“Oma’s special”. – I take personal offense to that last one.

* Tip: Oma’s written recipes (in the unlikely event she has any written down) create a special headache. In place of measurements you’ll be provided with excellent describing words such as “Some” or “a bit” or “lots”. Also, since English is most likely her second language the recipes will be in one long paragraph without ANY punctuation. In my experience there will be a short story or two randomly mixed into the recipe which adds to the confusion.

* Tip # 2: Just eat it. Food allergies and diets are not met with sympathy. Avoid saying things like “This cream gravy is too fatty”  “I’m on a diet” or “I’m allergic to ____”. These are attributed to weakness. Skinny girls with allergies (I’ll just say it because I am…Irish) would never have survived harsh Russian/Canadian winters. 

3. Family is sacred. These gatherings are huge. There will be many relatives and your husband won’t know how he’s related to half of them. He’ll refer to everyone (except Oma and Opa) as his “cousin”. Whether or not they are his cousins are up for debate.

* Tip: Sometimes the family will tell stories. They’ll start in English but as the story teller gets excited, they’ll inevitably end in Low German. You’ll know it’s over when everyone laughs. Smile, nod and say, “Nayo.”

* Tip # 2: Every Mennonite family has a relative who’s still convinced the Commies are coming to get him. The way to deal with this relative is to smile, nod and say, “Nayo.”

* Tip # 3: When planning a small gathering make sure you clarify SMALL. In Mennonite terms it could mean 200 of his closest relatives. Seriously.

*Tip #4: If you need to know how he’s related to someone specifically, always ask Oma.

4. Oma is sacred.

5. Mennonite Game. If ever in Mennonite country (Manitoba, Saskatchewan…a flat frozen farm…) it’s polite to ask new acquaintances what their last names are and try to find how you’re related to them. This is commonly referred to as the Mennonite game.

* Tip: Study his relative’s names along with their occupation and town.  I’ve calculated 5 last names for every 5000 Mennonites but I’m no mathematician. My husband Jon and his cousin Jon have the same name. True story. KnowinJohann%20Kehler%20Blumenfeld%20Nicopol%201905g their occupation (Pastor, Farmer, Truck Driver or Teacher) and their town (Steinbach, Niverville, Mitchell, Kleefeld etc) helps narrow down those with the exact same names. Example: “Is your Uncle, Farmer Abram X from Steinbach or Pastor Abram X from Grunthal?”

(I apologize to any pastor or farmer Abrams from Steinbach and Grunthal).

6. Music. Everyone sings and plays some kind of instrument. They are infinitely better than you and all of your non-Mennonite friends. I’m convinced it’s something to do with their mutated genetics. Mutations resulting from surviving in subzero temperatures on borscht for centuries. They sing at the family gatherings, they sing their prayers, they sing for everything. Face the music – you are marrying the Sasquatch version of the Von Trapps. If you don’t sing or play anything, it’s time to learn something. FAST.

* Tip: If you’re not musically gifted and my theory is sound, eat borscht and pray for talent.

Take a deep breath and realize your family is equally as crazy. There are just a lot less of them. Congrats! You are so blessed to be marrying into a huge, loving, musical, close, beautiful and crazy sasquatch-family!580893_477425162287187_199728486_n (1)

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253 thoughts on “About Mennonites: 6 Warnings From an Outsider.

  1. I love how I can only understand written low German if I read it out loud. Love all the comments. And my OMA made fruit vereniki that we sprinkled in sugar and put a sweet (versus sour) cream sauce on. When we were older she made the glumms (cottage cheese) vereniki with butter sauce. I continued to sprinkle sugar on mine.
    At the yearly MCC Auction and Sale the line up for the vereniki and farmer sausage is the longest of all.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Oh, my goodness. I thought I was the only one who had to read it out loud in order to understand it. Sometimes I go to Blue Letter Bible where they have a low German Bible–I practice reading it out loud to learn more words. You should try it, Laurie!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Went straight to BLB to find this, and couldn’t! I want to do this! My aunt sends Low German cartoons to me on Facebook and I love sounding them out so I get the laugh. I fear Low German is going to die, because I, and so many people I know, understand it, but can’t speak it. Grievous!

        Liked by 3 people

      • I don’t know how much I’d be worried about people not being able to read low German. It was never really a written language, mainly a spoken one. That’s why no one can agree on how to spell it. I think it may well be dying out, but that has nothing to do with people not being able to write it.

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    • when i try to tell my family a joke my Granny told me many years ago, it never is the same as they don’t understand lowgerman.
      We put a sweet rhubarb sauce on them as well. Oh now I am getting hungry for glums vereniki. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Supposedly Mennonites feel that tracing ancestry and kinship is ONLY a mennonite game. Let me tell you it is not! My husband’s families, both maternal and paternal, are Anglo-Saxon all the way. My mother-in-law was always defining her relatives and “who is who in the zoo”. I believe it is a matter of people loving people.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Enjoyed all the comments and sentiments, I have memories of my own with ALL these wonderful, yummy foods that my mama made from scratch… 😀 Cooking used to be an art form… now SO much is packaged and a “trip to Cosco,” which is great, but there’s really nothing like gramma’s “home cooking!!!” ❤ ❤ ❤

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  4. Low German was taught at the U of M in winnipeg Man. We still speak the languaget which has not been updated n still spoken in the Nertherlands were our forefathers came from in the 15500 on the treak to finally lin the lowlands of Russia then on to canada in 1879 Jokes are never as funny as in Low German

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  5. Tamara, your Oma Thiessen made the best vereneki and sauce that I have ever tasted. We’d come to your house and she would make a special batch. Yummm! Most of your “warnings” are valid. The language, I have learned is actually a legitamet language and predates most other languages in Europe. There are pockets of areas that still speak it in russia, S. America and Canada and the US and, of course, Northern Europe!
    thanx for your article.
    Uncle Jim

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    • RollKuchen! My Oma (Grandfather’s sister, so not truly my Oma, but still oma) made this and it’s AMAZING! with watermelon.

      It’s funny, I don’t consider myself mennonite, BUT all of this applies to my family (ukrainian family sponsored by mennonite church to come to Canada). We play who’s related to who, we talk about MOOS (not moose, but a drink), and roll kuchen, and pieroshki (fruit filled perogies).

      thank you for writing this, for ANYONE who has this family.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. You missed the one where the Mennonites will often take pictures of the dead in their caskets or at the funeral or cemetery. Or is it only my Mennonite relatives who do that?

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    • I can so relate, haha. There’s more to this though! The foods, the “traditions” and the fun in dysfunction! But so much of it nailed my whole heritage. So many people insist the Mennonites are interbred!
      Think: cracklins, krumsborscht, zumaborsct, plumma moos.

      I thought other people’s cultures took pictures of the dead in their caskets too? I didn’t know it was part of the heritage?

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      • I got a charge out of your comments Sarah, First,..about OTHER nationalities and religions/cultures DO take pictures of their dead,..so it’s not only the Mennonites!
        Second… I hear that also about interbred or even “incest”..but take it as a joke… and I realize so often it’s because the sir-names of so many are the same,..yet not related by blood at all. Just common names! (*Take the name of Jones,..or Smith,..Anderson,..Black..OR White?? .. Are ALL the people with those sir-names related?
        NO!!
        Names such as Friesen,.Funk,.Dueck,.Thiessen,..etc.,etc are common names among the German/Russian Mennonites.
        I find that we of Mennonite heritage,.. generally speaking,… laugh at ourselves over some of the “put-downs” and
        don’t take things too seriously… Thanks God!!

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      • I hadn’t heard the name Zummaborsht which translate to summer soup, We called it Crout borscht and is made from the tops of all veggies in the garden, dill, onion tops, just add water, bits of ham and of course lots of cream!!

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      • OUR ZUMMABORSHT WAS MADE WITH [ZOOROMP] SORRELL WHICH THE MENNOS BROUGHT FROM RUSSIA AND NOW GROWS WILD IN MB. AND SK. ADD SOME SOUR CREAM AND SLICED BOILED EGGS. IT’S THE ULTIMATE SOUP.

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  7. All said here is true ,I was raised in a Mennonite famiy,wonderful welcoming people,and the best food and still take pictures at funerals.And nothing funnier than the low german language,love it.

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  8. Another important warning is: any non-Mennonite who marries into a Mennonite family will be treated with suspicion. Inbreeding is a major part of Mennonite culture (as a Mennonite, I’m allowed to say this). Of course, a few of us (your husband and me, for example), recognize the need to “thicken the bloodline”, and therefore marry someone whom we can’t find someplace on the family tree. Nah Yo?

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  9. Thanks to whomever wrote this for the good laugh!! All is true here! Yes, we ate “fattening” food, took pictures at funerals, and our parents spoke high German to us and low German to each other and the relatives. Somehow we just picked up the low German. We went to German School every Saturday morning for 6 yrs. Thanks to that I am still able to read German but sad to say my tongue doesn’t want to twist that way any more! I’ve learned to make all the traditional foods to pass on to my kids and the grands.

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  10. I really enjoyed this one though I have seen it before. My background is also Mennonite and we spoke it at home. Our favorite foods were all long on cream and vegetables canned in quarts in summer for winter use. Along with berry jam etc. and always home baked bread and buns for Sunday ‘faspa’ it was a good life.

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  11. Love it! I grew up in Winnipeg, but my folks left Mennonitism when I was five. Joined another cult…:). Read The God Followers, my book about this experience. However, just because we no longer practised Mennonitism as a faith…the family was impossible to rid ourselves of…not that we wanted to. The complicated kindnesses of being in a Mennonite is as slippery a slope as being a leader of the free world like Harper or Obama, but the rich foods that make up the staple diet of the Mennonite are just too good to walk away from.

    You can get my book at Amazon. com…here’s the link…http://www.amazon.com/The-God-Followers-In-beginning/dp/146629079X

    I love this article. Straight to the point, but not dismissive of the often dismissive Mennonite aunts, omas and uncles…lol…children should be seen and not heard, right? Well, at least we all grow up and learn about real life…and choosing to live the Mennonite way isn’t as bad as many ethnic lifestyles…it’s just harder to read the recipe books. 🙂

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  12. I concur with most comments here. Being the oldest I & my sister work on family genealogy and find many dead ends as so many did not survive the attrocities inflicted on the Mennonites & Ukranians too In the 20s & 30s in south Russia. Sad to say, few of the following generations have interest in their histories and the Omas &,Opas are almost all gone. Also, many of the seniors are reluctant to talk about what they experienced and saw.
    Everyone should have at least one copy of a Mennonite cookbook in their cookbook collection.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’M VERY FORTUNATE,SPENDING MANY HOURS HEARING ABOUT THE LIVES OF MY 4 GRANDPARENTS IN RUSSIA [UKRAINE] BEFORE FLEEING TO CANADA IN 1924. I’VE ALSO GOT PHOTOS OF GREAT GREAT GRANDPARENTS. TONS OF INFORMATION, HOW GREAT IS THAT?

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I sure enjoyed reading the comments and I also am a mennonite,enjoy all the tradional foods, have made all of them myself.It was a great way of life back then and we were much better off then we are today.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Oh my! I was raised in the Oklahoma panhandle, not in Canada, but I can relate to all of this! I can still speak nearly passable Plaut Deutch, and I believe that, with just a little language work I could speak High German again. Low German was considered somewhat vulgar for church use (much like only Latin was acceptable in the Catholic Churches until recently), so when my maternal grandfather started in the ministry, my mom’s family began to speak only High German. I’ve passed down many recipes to my children (I’m an Oma!), but sadly, the Plaut Deutch language in our family will die with me. Although my husband and I are both of this culture, his parents never spoke the language with their children. I tried for some time to speak it with my kids, but it didn’t make it past a few phrases. Must go for now to bake some zwiebach. Nah yo.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I am Mennonite by background on both sides (mother and father) and from east and west (Ohio and Kansas/Oklahoma). Am loving doing family history research so I can play the Mennonite game better!. My Dad had a platdietsch Bible but unfortunately I cannot read it, even though I speak Dutch. Lots of wonderful heritage!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. My husband’s mother was from a conservative Mennonite background, and her fiancee was from a conservative Mennonite background, albeit first generation, so he knew no low German. Mom’s father was opposed to the marriage on that ground, even though Dad B. had been a CO in a mental hospital and was raised on a farm, he did not speak any German. Mom’s dad eventually came around, and obviously didn’t stop the wedding. I married my husband back when the “Old Mennonite” and “GC” were still separate, and he was the former and I was the latter. Fortunately my husband’s eldest sister had already breached that divide by living with (!!!) and then marrying a GC, so his folks were OK with me. It helped that we met through a church that was tri-conference affiliated at the time (then became MCUSA).

    My own mother, ethnic Mennonite but raised in Chicago, met and married a non-Mennonite (and ex-Marine) at Bluffton College. I asked her once how her family had accepted my dad, and she said that they were just glad he was Christian. She added that she had made up her mind NOT to marry him if (in his quest to be a minister) he did NOT attend the Mennonite seminary (then in Chicago), although she had never told him that. So there was open-mindedness about some things, but everyone draws the line somewhere. That said, my dad is more solid in his beliefs in nonviolence because of his stint in the Marines, than many ethnic Mennos I’ve met.

    Being a PK, I had the opportunity to encounter a variety of regional Menno foods and customs because we lived in different regions of the US. I also had a whole side of the family that wasn’t Menno, so there was some reprieve in the Menno game (we did find that when I was at Bethel College that I was related to 20 people there – all from my mom’s side). I think my son at Goshen is related to at least 3 people there.

    Now I live in Kansas and enjoy verenike at the relief sale, and make peppernuts every year during the Christmas season. Our church has a borscht fundraiser every year. Our difference make us richer, and love can overcome bias. Apologies if you’ve read this saga before… I was too lazy to scroll around and see what I posted before

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I feel the need to point out that a lot of the things here are very Russian Mennonite specific. As a Swiss Mennonite, I only ever ate borscht at summer camp, and my family speaks Pennsylvania Dutch, not Low German.

    We do play the Mennonite game though.

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  18. I just have to reply too. I’m born and bred Swiss Menno from Ontario who married a “Russian” Menno and living in Manitoba. I relate to this too because lots of your points (and those from other comments like the crazy coffin photos!) are so cultural even other Mennonites feel like outsiders. So as at least one other comment said, this entry would be more accurate as “About Russian Mennonites.” It might seem small but it’s huge. The food is different, the German dialect is different, the war experience is way different, the last names are different, and the variations on passive-aggression are different! And many of us still have “cousins” who drive horse and buggy or cars with all the shiny bits painted black. I guess another example of how the differences within can seem bigger than the differences between groups.

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  19. This was a fun read from the outside looking in. We always had to provide interpreters when giving instructions to patients or caregivers when leaving the hospital if English wasn’t their first language. I went to teach a set of parents how to use a piece of equipment knowing I would need a Russian interpreter (per the nurses instructions). Needless to say, the adorable new parents had no idea what the interpreter was saying. After listening to them talk to each other I asked where exactly they were from. They told me a tiny town in SW Kansas. Having grown up near there and then later spending a few years in southern German countryside, I pulled my Bauer Deutsch (farmer German that I picked up quicker than proper German) out of my back pocket and was better able to teach these young parents.

    My grandfather was raised by Mennonites and he cherished family. He was one of many children that were (not so legally) adopted out after their mother died. The family took in the three youngest children and raised them well. I grew up knowing I always had family. He did not stay in the faith but the family values held fast. Thanks for such a great article!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I find this so much like some of my family’s beliefs. I also became a mennonite on my own about 3 years ago, and I loved every minute of it. I’m taking a break from church life at the moment, but still a beleaver at home. Yes, this is so true with Mennonites and Mormons. 😊

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  21. This might help those of you who come into the family knowing none of the Low German language or those who, have forgotten many of the lesser spoken words and phrases: http://www.mennolink.org/doc/lg/ I just discovered this site today, and I’ve had a delightful time reacquainting myself with the mother tongue.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m reading this month’s later, so not sure anyone will read this comment. For those who are interested, there are Plautdietsche dictionaries that are available. We held Plautdietsche classes in Saskatoon a couple of years ago, and each participant bought one. I can’t remember where they were purchased, but believe we bought them through MCC. They’re an excellent resource for anyone who wants to brush up on their Plautdietsche, or for those who would love to learn this beautiful language. 😊
      It’s been great reading all these comments, and brings back many awesome memories. Our family still enjoys all the delicious foods that were mentioned here. 😊
      Linda Doell

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  22. One more thing, I am a curator of a museum that features many items of the Mennonite life. Recently a couple of ladies came in that were passing through on their way to CA. They were not Mennonite but had ancestors that were. Sure enough! after discussing geneoligy and looking at photo’s of their relatives we found out we were related!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. As has been mentioned, limited first names(biblical) were used and surnames were also limited in the small Manitoba community I grew up in. Middle names were not used. This caused nightmare as there could easily be 5 persons with identical first and last names.
    To distinguish then, especially for the post office, initials were . used. The first was the first letter of your mothers maiden name. Often more then one of those. Then you went to your paternal grandmothers last names initial and it could carry on. I recall a PDKF Hiebert as opposed to a PDFH Hiebert. Go figure. I am very proud of my heritage albeit somewhat ashamed growing up with my first name and heritage being surrounded by French and English communities but I sure got over that. I have many artifacts of my ancestors that came from Russia in 1874,

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I was trying to explain the other day to my American wife how I (a Plett) was somehow related to a Toews. Thank you for explaining exactly how that worked.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I worked in a foundry in Winkler, Manitoba. We had three guys with exactly the same name and surname. Luckily they worked in different departments, so we’d refer to them by the department they worked in.

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  26. Fun article and comments! My grandpa was one of a few of those Abram Friesens in his community… he always made sure to say “there’s no ham in my name!” when he introduced himself to make sure they got it right.

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  27. Pingback: Everything You Need to Know About Low German. | LateToEveryParty

  28. I am a Scottish origin man who married a Mennonite lady whose ancestors came from Manitoba. The Mennonite game is played by Scots too so it is not that unique. Family is indeed important and I am blessed to be in a supportive in-law family. There was a family reunion here and there were several hundr”ed that got together for a long weekend of visiting and eating. It was good to catch up with the extended relatives from the area. Some I have met even a couple years later at work and we recognize each other.
    Each culture has its own response to erosion of its language and culture by others. Some in the extended family took different means to ensure that the language and culture are preserved.
    I have allergies too and they were met with a greater sympathy.
    Some of the recipes are different. Farmer sausage in Winkler area is a lot smokier than it is here in Saskatchewan.
    Some of the more important words to learn are “shife” (crooked) “reichevorste” (farmer sausage) and “vite” (the honeymoon is over)

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    • I am of Mennonite heritage, although currently not part of the Mennonite church. I married a Canadian of British origin. My family accepted him immediately which was expressed by an elderly aunt when she told my sister ” we’ll have to make an effort to keep him”. I agree that searching our roots is universal….my mother-in-law was forever outlining connections with other folk to me. My non Mennonite husband loves menno foods, accompanied me on the Mennonite Heritage Cruise with the Ungers in 2003, being identified as the only non-Mennonite on the cruise. He still refers to things we experienced when we are in discussion of it with other folk. We also frequently visit the Mennonite museum in Steinbach. Every group of people has “saints and sinners” and I have never understood why so many feel we are not part of the whole.

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  29. Had a good laugh, love the article!
    Did anyone translate Nayo to you in the comments?! In my opinion in high German it would be written as “Na ja”… And would be comparable to “ah well”

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  30. All this talk of food is making me hungry–again. I think this summer is the first in my life that I didn’t get Roll Kuchen!
    I thoroughly enjoyed the article.

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  31. LOL… I have SO enjoyed all this banter… and the original blog posts as well. My name is Julie C Myers and a.k.a. Nearly Nicks. I was lucky enough to get me one of these “Mennonite Boys” as well. I grew up in Memphis TN and have been an entertainer all my life. Anything from Las Vegas show girl to just being myself as a Singer/Songwriter. Even did a stint with Playboy. My husband’s mom and dad are now 88 years of age… and I will tell you, these Mennonite people age very well. I was only married to this man 4 years ago… but my new Mother in law took to me like I’m her long lost daughter! I’m her family favourite it would seem. I LOVE the soups these people make… and Oba Yo the Cream gravy is VERY fattening…(I swear I gain 3 pounds just passing the table when it’s being served). “MennoniteGirlsCanCook.Com” is my go to by now. Zomma Borshct, Komst Borscht, Butta Zup, Carrot Soup, Green Bean Soup …. all spectacularly delicious and actually quite GOOD for you! I spent most of my life in California, Nevada, and Florida… but wouldn’t trade where I am now in Southern Manitoba for anything. It’s a dry cold, I can tell you… and at minus 20 I can tolerate the weather considerably better than the plus 40 or 115 degrees F on a typical summer day in Palm Springs. I can relate to the music thing you write about… as my husband is a ‘casual musician’.. but would put many professionals I’ve worked with to shame. His father, (my new father in law) played in 4 different seniors bands until just recently. Old age here is celebrated and and wow… they DO get old here. My mother in law just checked into a personal care home after a debilitating stroke… and she got the room recently vacated when the oldest living woman in North America passed away at 115 years of age. Her name was Mrs Buhler… a cousin of my new father in law’s. His grand father lived to be 106 and died while at work milking cows and doing the chores. I find some of the ‘Old Colony’ sects of this religious group troublesome in many ways… but that’s a topic for another discussion. My husband employs 300 people and speaks the Low German Dialect fluently… and regular “High” German fairly well by my estimation as well. He is forced to here in Southern Manitoba.. as we have had more than 1000 new families immigrate to this region from Germany and Russia in just these last few years. People who are not happy with the political situation in Germany now. Forgive my rambling… but please know, this Catholic German/Irish girl found love in the ranks of this complicated world of the Mennonites. Cheers everyone… and best wishes to everyone playing the Mennonite game just now! ~ Julie

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  32. Did you hear about the group of Mennonites ice fishing one winter? They fell through the ice and yelled for help, “Oh Schmidt! Wiebe Friesen Fast! Koehn you call for help? The Enns is near!!!”

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      • I LOVE reading these goofy Mennonite stories and /or jokes,..recipes,..etc I have no idea where I would fit into the “order of Mennonites”..however, I consider my heritage to be of Mennonite extraction and can relate to SO many of these funny experiences that are sent by your readers…Love them!!

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    • Cute, but the guy on the shore said, “Nayo, I can’t because I was Kuhl, now I’m Friesen, and soon I’ll be Froese.”

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      • Good one Dave Rogalsky! I wish we could write in the Plaat Deetsch language (dialect) whatever we want to call
        that “unrecognizable” German ?? I have never laughed as hard as when my goofy cousin starts to talk with the German as we learned it as children..nothing could describe situations or smells or tastes or sensations as that special LANGUAGE can!!!

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  33. By the way you could interchange any state on the East Coast ( in the U.S.) for Canada provinces, switch Russian to Swiss German, and any one of 10 family Swiss family names and anyone with roots in Lancaster Co. could identify with this article. My mother points out with pride that one of the first Mennonite migrations to Canada (before the Russians) came from our part of Lancaster Co !

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  34. Wow. That was interesting. For a season i was old order in the usa. My experience was similar. We didnt have electricity or anything. Just little ol house on the prairie in 2010. But families were huge. The average famiy had 8+ children. And sometimes recipes were hard to get. Especialy for scrapple. Ummmm good eatin. Especially fried pork scrapple. Anyway thank you for sharing your experience.

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  35. True about singing 🙂 We do sing pretty much all the time. Grocery stores, cooking, working etc. Singing is giving praise to God. It’s not genetic, it’s knowing your vocal range. I’m mezzo. Learn yours and stick with it, even if it’s not what you would like. Learn the flow of the music and adjust accordingly and get plenty of Acapella CD’s. Once you get the hymns you will find out pretty quickly where your range is. You will learn in no time and you will learn to love your voice 🙂 Blessings 🙂

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  36. I went to a mennonite farm in Durango mexico about 20 yrs ago. I would try to talk to the ladies (im a girl, so i was taught to direct my conversations to women) but the men would answer for them!! They made the BEST cheese, salami and bread. I went to their farm for that purpose, haha. Anyway, i tried so many times to talk to the ladies, but it was useless. Idk if they didnt understand me, or didnt want to have anything to do with me. I like to think they didnt understand me. I didnt even have makeup on either… I live in WA state (the east side) and i wish there were mennonites here that sold cheese. And that would talk to me 😦

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